Posted by & filed under Security News.

Customers of the UK payday loan firm Wonga were warned that their personal details might have been stolen. The company explained that it was investigating illegal access to the personal data of its customers in the United Kingdom and Poland. According to the current information, 270,000 new and former customers, of which 245,000 are in the United Kingdom, could have been affected by the data breach.

 

 

Wonga offers 3-month loans priced at 1,286% APR and short-term 1,509% APR deals. The company started to contact borrowers last week, telling them there might have been illegal access to some of their personal data on Wonga.com account and offering them support via a dedicated phone line. Wonga said that the compromised data might have included name, email address, home address, phone number, the last 4 digits of a card number and/or bank account number and sort code. The company also believes that Wonga accounts had not been compromised, but customers were recommended to look out for unusual activity there.

This incident may completely destroy reputation of Wonga, which has been criticized for a series of controversies in recent years. The company advertised heavily on TV and via football sponsorships, but the financial regulator has found it issuing loans to customers who could not afford to repay them. Wonga was also found to have chased bad debts with letters from a fake law firm.

According to information disclosed by Wonga, after the introduction of tougher rules on lending it made a pre-tax loss of £80.2m in 2016, up from £38.1m the year before. The company website contains no information about the breach and carries its usual information on how to apply for its loans.

Source: Extratorrent

Save

Posted by & filed under Spyware Articles.

Are you downloading songs, movies or TV shows?

Your Internet Service Provider knows your IP address and can send Copyright Infringement Notice to you soon. So, what should you do if you have just received a copyright infringement letter from your Internet Provider or government agency like RIAA, MPAA and other?

Here you can find the best tips:

Copyright Infringement letters should generally be ignored. If they can”t confirm that you ever received the notice, they”re even less likely to go after you.

If you have received a copyright infringement letter, don”t respond to it, don”t visit the website provided, ignore threats of lawsuits and settlement offers, and if you are actually distributing the material in question, stop immediately.

The best way to avoid such a notice is prevention and education. If you have a wireless router and it is not secured or password-protected, you need to lock it down immediately. If you run BitTorrent client or other sharing software, it is a great idea to check for material being offered for upload by the software and remove it.

RIAA, MPAA and other Government Agencies don’t have your email unless you give it to them by replying. They send a complaint to your ISP with ONLY your IP address and your ISP figures out who that IP belongs to, at what time and your ISP sends out an email accordingly (read more here – You Could Be Liable for $150k in Penalties Per Downloaded Song)

When you torrent, you and all of your peers connect to a tracker and share your IPs. Copyright holders (Sony, Time Warner and etc) connect to the tracker, and collect the list all connected IP addresses. Then they give the list of “copyright infringers” to each ISP and the ISP basically informs you that they know.

ISP literally sees all your internet traffic, so they might monitor your every move. Now, if copyright holder wants to nab you, all they have to do is either bribe/threaten ISP to reveal your internet traffic,. Then, after they have your IP and logs that prove you”ve downloaded copyrighted file, they can legally and openly request the rest of your data from ISP.

If you don”t want to get any copyright infringement letters or even be known on the internet or have your ISP have access and records of every site you visit – ExtraTorrent recommends encoding and securing your connection with a VPN. The VPN (Virtual Private Network) is a service which routes all web traffic through a set of servers that hide your real IP from public view to ensure privacy and safety.

 

Source:  Extratorrent

Posted by & filed under Security News.

It looks like the big guys from tech giants are not immune from hackers. The Twitter account of Brendan Iribe, the CEO of Oculus (virtual headset maker) was hacked making him included in the list of important figures that had their social media accounts compromised.

 

twitter-hacked

 

Iribe’s account was taken over several days ago, with a tweet being sent out to his 16,000 followers announcing that Oculus is very excited to announce “its CEO – @Lid“. After this, the hacker @Lid went on to tweet at users and chastise Iribe for using the same pass for 4 years. Iribe’s Twitter account was reclaimed within hours, after the hacker tweeted that he could give it back in exchange for a free oculus rift “so i watch porn the cool way”. It is unknown if Iribe gave in to this demand.

 

Other popular people that accounts have been hacked are Mark Zuckerberg, Katy Perry, and Channing Tatum. Security experts continues to remind social media users to change their passwords frequently and refrain from using the same password to all their social media accounts.

 

Read this article How To Prevent Your Twitter Account From Being Hacked .

Save

Posted by & filed under Security News.

A recent study from Binghamton University also suggests your smartwatch or fitness tracker is not as secure as you think – and it could be used to steal your ATM PIN code.

The risk lies in the motion sensors used by these wearable devices. The sensors also collect information about your hand movements among other data, making it possible for “attackers to reproduce the trajectories” of your hand and “recover secret key entries.”

 

Read the rest of the entry here [Hacker News]

Posted by & filed under Security News.

A Las Vegas based casino operator has sued Trustwave for failure to protect the company from a breach that resulted in credit card theft, allowing the hackers to maintain their foothold during the investigation period.

The lawsuit was filed by Affinity Gaming in US district court in Nevada. This is the first case where a client challenges an IT security firm over the quality of its investigationfollowing a hacking attack.

According to Affinity Gaming, they hired the services of Trustwave to study and clean up the network intrusions compromise customers” credit data.

It was reported that the hackers gained accessed to more than 300,000 credit card details Affinity”s customers in restaurants and hotels.

Trustwave reported that it has identified the source of the data breach and contained the malware responsible for the attack.

However after a year, Affinity was again hit by a second payment breach. Mandiant, the competitor of Trustwave reported that the malware was not fully removed in the system.

Affinity gaming is seeking $100,000 in damages.

In response to Affinity”s accusations Trustwave spokesperson told the Financial Times (FT) on Friday, “We dispute and disagree with the allegations in the lawsuit and we will defend ourselves vigorously in court.”

 

source:  http://thehackernews.com/2016/01/casino-hacker.html